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Sojo Spa Club Review

Sojo Spa is a gigantic masterpiece standing at 140,000-square foot stretching over four floors in New Jersey. It combines eight pools and a sexy waterfall that erupts like a volcano into several nap rooms that create an enjoyable scrubbing experience for just anyone.

sojo spa sexy waterfall

Soja spa is a paradise to behold and one of the most sought-after spa in the country. People troop in all year round like it’s a tourist attraction to soak up their skin in the carbon-rich fragrance from the water. At Sojo spa, you will get an exceptional quality service with no description for race or body figure. Everyone is treated equally by their therapists and attended to like a special dignitary. This type of treatment ensure you come back for more

Like a tour guide taking you on a trip, I will take you through every aspect of the most popular spa in the world. I will guide through every area of the 140,000 square foot building. From the waterfalls to the sexy pools, not to mention the paradise-like treatment rooms. In the end, it feels like you’ve been there before, even if you didn’t step a foot from your home.

Getting To Sojo Spa

To get to Sojo Spa, you have to do the needful – drive down. You can take a shuttle from anywhere in New Jersey, but free shuttle is available to those coming from Manhattan. However, you will have to book in advance if your appointment is during the weekend since passengers are much on these days.

Apart from free shuttle van, there’s also a ferry van between Edgewater and Midtown West; however, you will have to walk for 17 minutes to get there on your own or hop on a bus if you can’t walk through the distance.

The cost of taking a ferry on weekdays is $60 while you’re charged $80 during the weekend. However, if you won’t be getting any treatment worth $150, I would advise you to settle for nearby spas. It would make little sense if your scrub is about $50, and you’re smashing over $100 on just transport.

On your first visit, ensure you bring sunscreen and a swimsuit along. You can also opt for spa outfits from Sojo, but if you’re bringing your swimsuit along, ensure they’re not too revealing as overly exposing swimwear isn’t allowed. You will be gutted to have gone through that trouble to get to Sojo Spa and end up not soaking yourself in their pool all because of your swimwear.

Secondly, Sojo provides a lot of facilities. In addition to swimwear, you will find soaps from different brands in the shower stalls plus hair dryers for drying your hair after coming out of the pool. You will also find a moisturizer and empty water most Clients rarely use.

Basically, All activities are organised and group into sessions. Sojo strives to create an atmosphere that’s almost as comfortable as that of your home. They ensure you’re comfortable all through, which is awesome, giving the fact that they don’t charge celebrity-like fees.

What Happens At Every Floor

Every floor has it’s own activity going down. The third floor is the least visited while the main treatment commences from the fourth floor. The first floor serves as a security check. There’s always a security guard to carry out searches, and you may have to forfeit some of your valuables in a locker. With the guard on watch, be assured that your properties are in the right hands.

Here’s a breakdown of every activity on each floor.

Checkout first time spa visit

First floor

This is where you make payment and go through security checks before tucking your shoes into the locker. From this point, you will have to go to the treatment table barefooted or opt for a flip flop when walking around.

After making payments, you will be given a wristband with a code on it that allows you to make payment at any point. The wristband works like an ATM card.

You can use it to pay for food and drinks and your treatment. However, the amount you’re allowed to use depends on the amount paid to the cashier on the first floor.

Floor 2-3

Have little knowledge of what goes down there. You’re welcome to take a little stroll on your next visit.

Fourth Floor

The fourth floor contains a lot of facilities. You will find the locker room, bathhouses, hydrotherapy pool, and the hinoki bar. For me, this is where I call the “happening” floor or “fourth heaven.”

The Locker Room: this is where you have to pick up your towel and robe. You can also make use of the bathroom and shower to freshen up before heading over to the bath-house for a scrub. I was more concerned about the pee splatters while heading into the bathroom since I was completely barefooted. Fortunately, there were paper slippers I could tuck my toes into.

Scrubs: The most popular area on the fourth floor is a “bathhouse.” It comprises of bathtubs as well as saunas and steam room where you can sweat it out. The bathhouse is also where body scrubs are given.

Sojo Spa uses the Korean bathhouse technique, which aims to completely get rid of old skin like shedding the exoskeleton of a mammal. Scrubs can be given in groups. You’re welcomed to bring your family member or close friend to the bathhouse.

Unlike in most spa where scrubs are given immediately after taking a shower, Sojo spa therapists prioritize neatness over all other factors.

Before a scrub is given, you will have to jump into a hot tub for 30 minutes with your bathing suit on.

After that, you will have to go back to the bathhouse and return naked. If you’re shy like I was, you can keep your bath suit, but this will restrict movement around your body, but this doesn’t mean the suit will be pulled off your body without your permission.

Sojo Spa scrub treatment address every part of the body. From your head to your toe, and even your belly button isn’t left out. It may hurt when your knees and elbows are scrubbed, but you will feel little pain when the other parts are scrubbed.

After the scrub, the process follows this pattern: rinse, oil massage, rinse, mask, and shampoo before taking a final rinse. All these leaves you feeling as soft as a newborn.

Premium scrub like the one described above cost around $150, but if you don’t want the shampoo and cucumber, you will only be charged for a medium treatment which cost around $115.

Basically, the scrub and oil massage are an essential part of the treatment. The shampoo mask looks like a waste of time. You could use that extra cash to pay for a shuttle back home.

Hydrotherapy Pool

The hydrotherapy pool at Sojo spa is massive and covered along each side to form an “L” shape. The covered side pays host for clients who would like to get pummeled by water jets. The temperature of the water is around 85 degrees, but there’s also a hot bath.

Hinoki Bath

Before my first visit to the Sojo, I had no idea what a hinoki Bath was. It didn’t sound like something I would like to try, but for some reason, I wanted to give it a try so I would have a lot of stories to tell.

The hinoki bath smells like lemon, thanks to the “hinoki thiol.” This lemony scent is meant to tranquilize your body and mind. What I love about the pool is how well it was beautified with flowers and plants. Making it look like you’re taking a bath in the garden of Eden.

The Silk Bath: it took some effort to pull myself from the hinoki pool, which has become my favorite spot. The silk bath is another spot I certainly love.

It feels like soaking yourself in milk, which is why I nicknamed it the “cream soda bath.” It felt fussy at first but grew into the milky looking water, hoping it bumps some collagen into my already healthy-looking skin.

 

 

LaCroix Tub

The official name is Carbon-rich tub but is more popular as LaCroix tub among Clients because it is shorter and more catchy. It isn’t one of my favorite spots.

You have to sit on a big rock and let the naturally occurring carbon dioxide diffuse into your bloodstream to improve blood flow. Whether or not this works is still a mystery, I will hope to unravel on my next visit.

The Ganbanyoku Sauna

While looking for an alternative to carbon bath, someone suggested I try the Ganbanyoku sauna. It’s directly behind the carbon bath, so I had no problem locating it.

It’s basically a huge room with hot stones in which you’re allowed to sweat the hell out. Laying on those hot stones, I thought about the whole Sojo Spa experience and all the troubles I went through coming down.

While I sat in, a violin movie soundtrack started playing in the background, which was the only thing I didn’t like about the sauna.

The Cold Waterfall

The carbon-rich bath was a pass for me, but it would be no brainier to come all the way down to Sojo Spa without taking selfies behind the cold waterfall. After a tortuous massage session, join thousands of people in the pic zone to take selfies behind this spot.

My adventure at the fourth floor ended at the cold waterfall. However, I made sure I took pictures at every point, starting from the locker room to my fave spot, the hinoki pool. Heading to the fifth floor, I wished it provided the same experience.

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The Fifth Floor

The fifth floor was more of saunas. I didn’t see any pool here, and my hope of finding another Pic zone was dashed immediately. On the fifth floor, you will find the red clay sauna, Himalayan sauna, and the infrared sauna.

There’s also a cold room designed to bring down your temperature after your sauna session, but the room wasn’t cold enough. It’s felt there should have been a bathroom where you can wash off all the sweat.

Himalayan Sauna

The Himalayan salt sauna is the most popular spot on the fifth floor. I wanted to know why it’s called the Himalayan salted sauna, so I poked the brick with my finger before sticking my tongue on it. The bricks had this hot salty taste.

The Himalayan salted sauna may not be the ideal Pic zone, but it had a lot of amazing spots I wished I had captured with my smartphone.

Red Clay Sauna

The red clay sauna, like the name suggests, contains redbrick’s that are illuminated by an orange light making the room uglier. This is obviously one spot I won’t be visiting again.

The Sixth Floor

After touring around this gigantic building, I finally found a place I could find something to fill my stomach with on the sixth floor. Since outside food isn’t allowed, you will have to buy all your food on the sixth floor.

The food here is fairly priced, and there are varieties. You can order for sandwiches, smoothies, or Japanese cuisines like a spicy pork rice bowl. I wasn’t a fan of chopsticks, so I went for something simple.

You’re welcome to experiment on your next visit.

Apart from the food stall, there’s also a volcanic sand bath on the sixth floor. Apart from the foods, this is the cheapest treatment available at Sojo.

I was charged $20 for this. All I had to do was change into a cotton robe and lay down for a man to stuff my body with hot sand. All this is done to ensure proper circulation, but I was having none of it after 10 Minutes.

Out of the room, I rolled the sand off my body. I wished there was a bathroom where I could take a quick shower. Since there was none, I had to change back into my spa gear and head up to the seventh floor.

Seventh Floor

The seventh floor has an outdoor grill with a rentable cabana to make out in. However, I was more interested in the infinity pool, which served as a selfie zone for me.

Conclusion

A visit with Sojo Spa is a once in a lifetime experience. I was impressed with the structure and level of organization. All the therapist looked like they knew what they were supposed to do. I felt like the numbers of saunas were too much.

I was particularly gutted after my visit to the sixth floor. I wish one of the saunas should have been substituted for a shower or a bathroom.

Basically, you will find a lot of pic zones within the spa. After your treatment, you’re free to feed your eyes and use some of their facilities for free. Ensure you don’t lose your wristband as this is your only evidence of payment.